Museum-to-Muzeum

Ivana Miculka of Valasske Mezirici, Moravia, Czech Republic and Lydia Faust, Snook, Texas, USA model Czech Kroj at the Czech Heritage Museum in Temple, Texas.

Ivana Miculka of Valasske Mezirici, Moravia, Czech Republic and Lydia Faust, Snook, Texas, USA model Czech Kroj at the Czech Heritage Museum in Temple, Texas.

This week, we were honored with a visit from Ivana and Ferdinand Miculka from Valasske Mezirici , Moravia, Czech Republic and Lydia Faust of Snook.  Ivana wore her native kroj and Lydia paired up, wearing her own kroj.

This beautiful style represents the Moravian Wallachia (Czech: Moravské Valašsko or simply Valašsko) region. The blue fabric is called "modrotisk." Originally, it was hand-printed with carved wooden block print stamps by resist method with either wax or resist paste, then dyed in indigo. The Japanese have a very similar fabric-dyeing technique with a 1400-old-history. Modrotisk is the literal translation of the Japanese word for the fabric, aizome, or “blue-print.” It is unclear how these two may be related, but Austro-Hungarian visitors to Japan in the 19th century recognized the similarities and afterward, exhibitions of the Japanese stencils were held in Moravia.

Ivana works at the Muzeum Beskyd in the Hukvaldy Castle at Frýdek-Místek. This is the area where many of the immigrants to Texas called their original home. It's in the beautiful Beskyd Mountains in the northeastern part of the country.

Hukvaldy Castle at Frydek-Mistek, Moravia, Czech Republic

Hukvaldy Castle at Frydek-Mistek, Moravia, Czech Republic

Links:

http://www.muzeumbeskyd.com/english/

https://www.academia.edu/27715450/Japanese_katazome_and_Moravian_modrotisk_Blue_Print_Techniques_in_the_19_th_Century